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  1. #1
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    Tada san confirms Toyota S-FR part of 3 sports car lineup

    Speaking to Australia's Drive, Tada san confirmed that the Toyota S-FR will sit at the bottom of Toyota's plans for a three sports car lineup.

    Full article below.

    Meet the Toyota 86's little brother.

    The Japanese giant officially revealed the S-FR concept at the Tokyo motor show and Tetsuya Tada, chief engineer of Toyota's sports car range spoke to the Australian media about his plans for the car.



    "I already tell you Toyota's sports car goal must be three brothers - 86 is the middle [brother], top model is something like a Supra," Tada said, confirming the S-FR sits at the bottom of the family tree.

    Officially the company has only released limited technical details of the car, most notably the dimensions and the fact it is front engined and rear-wheel drive, but hasn't said what is under the bonnet.

    Unofficial reports claimed the car was powered by a 95kW 1.5-litre non-turbo petrol engine but Tada didn't confirm. When asked what powers the S-FR Tada revealed he was considering three choices.

    "When you see the S-FR concept I suppose you imagine it is a 1.5-litre car but nowadays I can choose many kind of engines," he explained.

    "Downsized turbo, 1.5-litre naturally aspirated and something additional as well. Now we are thinking which one is the best engine for a small sports car."

    Tada also admitted that the company is unlikely to turn to a partner like it did with Subaru for the 86/BRZ or the new 'big brother' sports car with BMW.

    "Partnership is one solution to sports car projects," he said. "But that's not always the solution. Somethings must be made by ourselves."

    Despite the 86 already being the cheapest rear-wheel drive coupe on the Australian market, Tada hinted he wants the eventual production version of the S-FR concept to undercut it; making it a more affordable way for younger buyers to get into their first sports car.

    "Everybody expects that a smaller sports car than the 86 must be more affordable," he said.

    Tada wouldn't be drawn into when the car is likely to see production but said it was an important car for the brand, in keeping with company president Akio Toyoda's vision for fun to drive cars.

    http://www.drive.com.au/motor-news/d...#ixzz3pugfXhxf

  2. #2
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    Hard to imagine all the foreign press and then keep it in Japan only. Probably won't get done until 2018 at the earliest.

  3. #3
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    Although I would love for Toyota to do it all by itself, I don't see how they can keep the S-FR affordable if they dedicate a unique chassis to it that's not shared with anything else.

  4. #4
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    If anyone can do it, it would be Toyota or maybe Honda.

  5. #5
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    By using parts bin parts for everything else. The same way they did with every other sports car they made since the first Celica. Making the chassis will be the only small hurdle.

    It will most likely use suspension taken from the Prius C (Aqua) Interior switches and fittings taken from one of the major component manufacturer's catalog.

    Hey, your AW11 is a unique chassis, which is essentially an AE82 cut in half and reversed. Most of the parts in the AW11 are sourced directly from the Corolla. They've done it before and if they want to do it again, there is no reason they can't do it inexpensive.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by OKASFR View Post
    By using parts bin parts for everything else. The same way they did with every other sports car they made since the first Celica. Making the chassis will be the only small hurdle.

    It will most likely use suspension taken from the Prius C (Aqua) Interior switches and fittings taken from one of the major component manufacturer's catalog.

    Hey, your AW11 is a unique chassis, which is essentially an AE82 cut in half and reversed. Most of the parts in the AW11 are sourced directly from the Corolla. They've done it before and if they want to do it again, there is no reason they can't do it inexpensive.
    Actually the MR2 proves exactly my point that a unique chassis makes a car much less affordable--the MR2 was never really an affordable car (even though it was affordable by sports car standards).

    Let's take the Camry, the most popular family sedan, as a benchmark of affordability. In 1986, the MR2 MKI started at $11,298, while the Camry started at $9,378. In 1991, the MR2 MKII started at $14,898, while the Camry started at $12,688. In 2000, the MR2 MKIII started at $23,098, while the Camry started at $17,518.

    Had the MR2 had the economy of scale of the Camry its pricing would've been in line with the Corolla at most, let alone surpassing the Camry by such a margin.
    Last edited by ydooby; 11-03-2015 at 10:02 AM.
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